Why You're Getting Wind Noise ...

TWAAP

TwoWheelsAndAPonytail
Oct 28, 2016
96
39
18
www.youtube.com
I ride a
Husqvarna Nuda 900 & Yamaha SZR 660
I tried every place in my helmet. And yes....i also have a deadcat.

I use a boya GoPro pro Lavalier BY GM 10.
In my GoPro 4 silver directly.

When i am not riding. The sound is good.
 

HippoDrone

Moderator
Jan 2, 2017
3,719
2,212
113
West Sussex, UK
I ride a
2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
I watched a couple of your videos and it sounds almost as bad as if your external mic wasn't working and is only picking up audio from the camera itself. Have you tried a different mic?
 

UneasyRide

Wannabie Member
Mar 16, 2017
4
1
1
44
I ride a
Suzuki GSX650F
Your screen has a lot to do with the wind turbulence too, pushing wind in and around your lid
 

WingManGT

Wannabie Member
Jan 16, 2017
216
148
43
32
Varna, Bulgaria
www.facebook.com
I ride a
2004 Kawasaki ZX-6r

Superballs

Superballs' Supervids
Jul 16, 2017
222
143
43
39
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
I ride a
1999 VFR800Fi
I use this type of microphone, front and center behind the chin bar with just a foam sock over the entire thing. LoL!

Oh, such irony! :D
I use this exact mic as well.

I love the stereo effect, and the wind noise is minimal when speaking. It's light and bassy when not speaking.

I personally like a little bit of wind noise, I mean, wind noise is a part of motorcycling and being able to capture it in a controlled fashion is a great thing. It's painful when it's overwhelming or gets in the way of the audio. Fortunately, I never really seem to have a problem with the wind overwhelming my voice or my engine.
 
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Panotaker

Wannabie Member
Jul 25, 2017
41
28
18
62
Austin, Texas
I ride a
2008 Yamaha FJR-1300
I am just getting into motovlogging. I started out with a Sony CS3 microphone, but there is no place to fit it in my Shoei RF1200 helmet without the microphone hitting my face. There is simply no room. The mic does work great, and sounds fantastic, I just don't have any room in my helmet to mount it. I have a Sena 20S for communications, and that flat mic that comes with it fits perfect, and it doesn't hit my face. So I got another mic just like it. The mic has a 2.5 mm plug on it. My camera is a Sony FDR-X3000. It has a 3.5mm jack on it, so I bought a 2.5mm to 3.5mm adapter, and an extension cable, and was able to plug the microphone straight into the camera without doing any soldering. Only problem is that the mic is mono, so it only records on one channel, which sucks. So I go back to the electronic store and bought a stereo to mono adapter (the only kind they had) and I figured that would put the audio on both channels, but instead, I got no audio. So I figured, no problem, I'll just duplicate the one channel in iMovie, so I can have audio on both channels. Well I found out that in iMovie, you can't duplicate the audio and add it as a second track. You can do it with other software, but it's a nightmare. So I guess the only option I have left is to cut off the plug on the mic and the extension cable, and wire them up like you did, so I can have mono audio on both channels. I can't believe nobody makes a simple solution to have a blogging setup on a motorcycle. Sena does have one, but it doesn't work with the Hero 5. The main reason I got the FDR-X3000 was for the mic jack on the camera, but there is no turn key solution for me since a bulky lab mic doesn't fit my helmet, without the mic wedged up against my face. So I guess I will have to go spend more money on a soldering iron and shrink tubbing, to make my setup work. I did try the mic with the FDR-X3000, and it sounds fantastic, but it only has audio on one channel. Once I rewire the mic, it should work out pretty good.
 

Superballs

Superballs' Supervids
Jul 16, 2017
222
143
43
39
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
I ride a
1999 VFR800Fi
Personally I don't think it's that hard. A program like audacity will allow you to do it easily enough.

What I like about adobe's software suite is I can open a file from premiere directly in audition, edit it and save it and it will just replace the file in premiere. Relink the audio video and boom you're done.

If you are mixing a stereo cable with a mono mic it will likely place the track on one side. Make sure your hardware chain is all mono from mic to camera and you should get proper mono
 

Panotaker

Wannabie Member
Jul 25, 2017
41
28
18
62
Austin, Texas
I ride a
2008 Yamaha FJR-1300
Personally I don't think it's that hard. A program like audacity will allow you to do it easily enough.

What I like about adobe's software suite is I can open a file from premiere directly in audition, edit it and save it and it will just replace the file in premiere. Relink the audio video and boom you're done.

If you are mixing a stereo cable with a mono mic it will likely place the track on one side. Make sure your hardware chain is all mono from mic to camera and you should get proper mono
Yeah, I know I can do it in Audacity, but that is just extra work, i rather just have audio on both channels right off the bat. You are probably right about just having a straight mono signal all the way, but the problem I ran into is the adapter that converts the 2.5mm to 3.5mm is a stereo adapter. The local store didn't have a mono adapter, the extension cable is also stereo. I guess most people buy stereo adapters, so they don't carry any mono stuff. I guess I can order something on the internet, but I'm just going to cut off the plug and hard wire it and be done with it. It shouldn't be this complicated in this day and age. Shoei makes great helmets, Sena makes great communication gear, Gopro and Sony make great cameras, but you try to mix them all together to make a motovlogging setup, and it becomes a nightmare. It shouldn't be this complicated is all I'm saying.
 

Superballs

Superballs' Supervids
Jul 16, 2017
222
143
43
39
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
I ride a
1999 VFR800Fi
Well it really isn't that complicated. The simple solution is a solution you are opting out of.

That said. Props on being confident enough to solder the connections and I hope that it gets you the results you are looking for.
 

Panotaker

Wannabie Member
Jul 25, 2017
41
28
18
62
Austin, Texas
I ride a
2008 Yamaha FJR-1300
Well I got ahold of an extra flat S20 helmet mic. It comes with a 2.5mm male mono plug. So I cut off the plug to wire it to both channels on my stereo extension cable, so I could get audio out of both channels. Big mistake! the wire in the 20S mic is not the same wire that is shown in the video. It is microscopically thin, and it doesn't have any insulation to take off. The ground wire is copper, but I have no clue what the other wire is made out of. It was impossible to solder, so I ruined a good mic. So I decided to see if I could make the Sony ECM-CS3 lapel mic work in my helmet. The problem with that mic is that it is huge, and I don't have enough clearance in the front of my helmet to mount it, without the mic hitting the front of my face. So I took a chance and took the lapel mic apart. I first took off the alligator clip, then i took that giant barrel off. Once I took that round barrel off, it revealed the two stereo mics which are tiny! So I took the left cheek pad off the helmet, and stuffed the two mics in the front of the cheek pad, and ran the wire out the back of the helmet, and plugged it into my FDR-X3000 camera. It works great, and the mics are hidden and work perfectly! I tried it out at 80 mph and it is nice and clear. I'll post some pictures as soon as I get 20 post.
 
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Sharktank

Wannabie Member
Sep 2, 2017
50
45
18
43
Tampa, FL
I ride a
2011 Road Glide Custom
I'm glad this is still a sticky. Need to find a mic like this. Also, aside from wind noise, I believe i'm getting vibrations on mic from wind buffeting on the helmet. I am using a modular, but the mic is sticking up out of the cheek pad instead of in the front mouth area for other reasons.
 

2WV

@2WheelVandal
Feb 25, 2017
482
246
43
South England
I ride a
A motorcycle, silly.
Put it behind the cheekpad fully. With a deadcat. May help a little. Either way, nothing wrong with experimenting
 
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Sharktank

Wannabie Member
Sep 2, 2017
50
45
18
43
Tampa, FL
I ride a
2011 Road Glide Custom
Put it behind the cheekpad fully. With a deadcat. May help a little. Either way, nothing wrong with experimenting
Not to fully derail the OP, but I moved my mic to my chin today and huge difference for the better.
 
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HYF

HOLDYOURFIRE
Aug 8, 2017
50
38
18
29
england, east sussex
I ride a
triumph speedmaster
i use the drift ghost s, i wasnt happy with the bit of sponge that came with the mic as it didnt really reduce the wind noise so i cut up a bit of thicker sponge from the kitchen and made a hole and fitted it to the mic and the sounds was much better and tried it on a really windy day on the coast and it didnt pick up any wind noise at all, its made my audio so much clearer :)
 
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WingManGT

Wannabie Member
Jan 16, 2017
216
148
43
32
Varna, Bulgaria
www.facebook.com
I ride a
2004 Kawasaki ZX-6r
Just a quick question. After finally deciding to start recording in the camera and not on a external recorder I've went ahead and tried to inform myself about the different mic specs to see what actually do I need. From what I've read (correct me if I'm wrong), the mic sensitivity is the culprit for most problems with poor sound quality and clipping. My current mic has a high sensitivity of -35dB and a good frequency response of 50 Hz to 20 kHz. This is all good if the mic is not like 5cm away from your mouth. The sound quality I'm getting is pretty good and clear, but when plugged into my action camera obviously the sound level is too high for it and sounds like crap. So I've decided to order a new way cheaper mic that is a lot less sensitive. It is specked at -55 dB, but the frequency response is 30 Hz to 15 kHz. I guess this explains why motovloggers have good luck with the cheapest microphones as the others are just too good for what we want them to do. Am I on the right track?
 
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WingManGT

Wannabie Member
Jan 16, 2017
216
148
43
32
Varna, Bulgaria
www.facebook.com
I ride a
2004 Kawasaki ZX-6r
Considering a microphone is nothing more than a speaker used the other way around (like electric motor/ dynamo), can I just solder a inline volume control from a pair of headphones on my mic adapter and have variable gain?
 

HippoDrone

Moderator
Jan 2, 2017
3,719
2,212
113
West Sussex, UK
I ride a
2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
if you got one with a sensitive enough resistance then yes but although the theory is correct regarding a mic being a speaker in reverse, they are not the same and the headphone speakers are a different rating to a microphone. You could try it but I suspect that the volume control for a set of headphones would not be the right resistance to be hugely effective. You could just wire in a resistor to get the level of gain you require or wire in a small variable resistor to have it adjustable.
 

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