Should You Start On A 600cc? Wrong Question

WingManGT

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Jan 16, 2017
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It depends on your self control. If you are an idiot, you can get yourself in trouble even on a scooter or 125cc bike. I've got my ZX6r 636 04 right after I've go my license (at 28). The interesting thing about sportbikes is that they make most of their power above 7000rpm so they aren't that scary to start on. You can grow with this bike and it has a lot better brakes and handling than the smaller and cheaper bikes. As for the twins. It can be difficult at times, as more often than not, they have more torque than a sportbike and they make more of their power sooner (at least it feels that way). So to sum it up, with good self control you can start on 600cc sportbike with no issues.
 

Superballs

Superballs' Supervids
Jul 16, 2017
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It depends on your self control. If you are an idiot, you can get yourself in trouble even on a scooter or 125cc bike. I've got my ZX6r 636 04 right after I've go my license (at 28). The interesting thing about sportbikes is that they make most of their power above 7000rpm so they aren't that scary to start on. You can grow with this bike and it has a lot better brakes and handling than the smaller and cheaper bikes. As for the twins. It can be difficult at times, as more often than not, they have more torque than a sportbike and they make more of their power sooner (at least it feels that way). So to sum it up, with good self control you can start on 600cc sportbike with no issues.
I do agree with you to an extent. As someone who started on a 750 v4 power cruiser.

The only objection I have with starting on a Supersport is that they do tend to be a lot less forgiving than smaller bikes and do have a lot less margin for error.

"Better brakes" is irrelevant. Both suoersports and beginner bikes (abs notwithstanding) can lock their tires or raise the rear wheel. How much better can brakes be? On a Supersport the brakes are going to grab faster...bit for a beginner is that really better? Having a little more play will allow a rider a little more control in a panic/emergency situation when they encounter their first emergency situation and less likely to low/highside by grabbing a fistful or stomping too hard on the rears.

Now a Supersport will likely have far better tires stock which will help with the rear wheel but makes it a bit more likely to flat out endo if they happen to be going too fast and grab that fistful. Abs also won't really protect against that as the rear wheel will lift before the front tire starts to slip.

Sure, you or I could have, in theory passed our license tests, gone out and grabbed a first generation Hayabusa and grown into them. Not because we are inhere try more skilled or better, but probably a bit more serious than some others...or a bit more risk averse, and cautious, or even better able to recognize or accept that we aren't as good at something as we like to think we are and therefore can draw ourselves reasonable and realistic limits. It's also possible that we have found a healthy application for imposter syndrome (the opposite of the Dunning-Kruger effect) and don't actually properly recognize how skilled we are at something and feel we are worse at it than we are.

Either way, it's not just about reckless youth, but honest mistakes. If people were often capable of recognizing that their next action was going to kill them in an accident, we would probably have far fewer fatalities on the road.

Aside from the power, there is also the weight consideration. It's a lot easier to be confident on a bike when you can easily hold it upright and that point where you can't hold it up is further from vertical. BUT that is going to vary from rider to rider. It was my main issue with starting on a 750 magna.

A Supersport isn't an automatic death sentence, but the wisdom of starting on one as your first bike is questionable at best.

I mean an f1 car has far better brakes and tires and a far stronger chassis than a Honda civic. Which one would you want your 16 year old child to drive on his or her first day on the road?
 

WingManGT

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Jan 16, 2017
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I wouldn't give my child either as we still have to be 18 here to drive :). Weight of the bike as important as it depends on the person who is going to ride it. As for the brakes you can lock up on most bikes which don't weigh a ton. I've went from 125/250 to 650 on my course as that is required in my country to get a full license. I can definitely notice the difference between each of those and is not just the power they provide. Like I said what type of a bike you get and CC is your own choice, but starting on a 600 is not the "worst decision" everybody is making it out be. As long as you can control yourself and know your limits. If you know you are going to do stupid and risky things I would suggest waiting a bit till you get it out of your system, before getting a bike in the first place, or get a slow one, although even a 250cc can hit 150km/h or more .....
 
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Superballs

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Jul 16, 2017
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If you know you are going to do stupid and risky things I would suggest waiting a bit till you get it out of your system, before getting a bike in the first place, or get a slow one, although even a 250cc can hit 150km/h or more .....
I can't agree with you more on this. The only....ONLY problem I have with it though, is that the average human's ability to recognize their future stupidity is rather low. Though, by that logic, very few people should ever get on a bike, so let's just drop a lampshade on that :).

Again, I could probably voraciously argue both sides with equal fervor. Small displacement bikes are still pretty awesome though, and even riding an 800cc V4 Sport Tourer, I could easily find a place in my heart for a Ninja 300 or an RC390.
 

F4celess

Cold
Dec 20, 2015
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I took my license on an 80cc two-stroke scooter. I was the only one who actually had fun getting my license.
You should try 50cc then, the very definition of inadequate is still kinda fun as it takes very little to extract everything they got. My new-to-me FZ6 is more a case of vast abundance. On that note, My current stance on the subject is that unless your country utilize tiered licensing, start south of 400cc, no amount of freedomz can counter for a new riders inexperience and courage. Even with a 20+hr course and license specific for large bikes behind me I still get scared on the FZ6 sometimes. Even if you are ever so careful and observant, handling a sensitive machine will easily fling you into a ditch in no-time if you slip up even once. Better not take the chance, even with the freedom to do so.
 
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HippoDrone

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Jan 2, 2017
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My old man made me go up in cc gradually... 50cc, 100cc, 125cc, 200cc, 400cc, 750cc V2, 600cc IL4, etc.... and I crashed every bike until I started riding what I wanted to ride.... I'm not sure what that says but when I had little bikes the throttle was either on or off and I think I tried riding larger bikes the same way which don't work lol.
 
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RiderInRed

The guy who rides in red
Jun 2, 2016
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My take at this is that a smaller CC bike will cost less to fix. If you get a shiny new 600cc sportbike and drop it (which will happen to a beginner at least one time) it might get damaged pretty badly and cost a little more to replace stuff on. a smaller CC bike can take a pounding and even if it gets ruined, hey, "you're gonnna get rid of it and get a bigger bike eventually" so you won't even be bothered too much if it gets damaged.
 

Panotaker

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Jul 25, 2017
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I'm glad my dad started me off on a mini bike back in the late 60's when I was around 12 years old. When I was 14, he got me a dirt bike. The day I turned 16, i got my motorcycle permit, and I took my road test about a couple of weeks after that. Starting that way today is probably not possible for most people since most people don't live in the country. If I was starting from scratch today, I would get what ever bike I don't mind dropping. Nothing sucks more than getting a brand new bike and dropping the damn thing and getting it all scratched up.
 

NF Vulcan

Never Hold In A Fart
Aug 26, 2017
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When I first thought of getting a bike (cruiser style), I asked some friends and most of them recommended something around 800cc but I found a great deal on my 1600 and it is my first (and only) bike. It was heavy but after a few weeks of practice I was riding good with very little issues. I think any bike will do (within reason) as long as it fits you and you make yourself comfortable with the handling.
 

2WV

@2WheelVandal
Feb 25, 2017
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A motorcycle, silly.
I went from 125cc to 675cc With no issues whatsoever. I passed all my tests first time (Mod1&2 including the theory) and i only started riding in June 2015! (i don't drive a car either). But honestly, in my own opinion i'd say start on a 250cc/450cc then jump to 700cc/900cc then after a few years make the finale step to 1Litre. If you can ride and have good ability and are somewhat mature, then shouldn't be an issue whatsoever. - Obviously that only applies to countries that dont have the restrictions like we do in the UK. Otherwise, If you're below 22 years old and in UK. Get 125cc and do the grind for 2 years. If you're 23 Years old. Wait a year and save up for your tests. Then pass all tests and jump onto a 250cc/450cc as your very first bike when you turn 24 years old. Dont bother with A1 Licensing and A2 i think is a waste of money and time personally unless you want to stay restricted.

If you did go the A1 and A2 route and are looking for your first unrestricted bike. Skip 600cc-800cc classes all together and jump ona 900cc - 1Litre. By now your ability in riding should be advanced and you should feel comfortable on bigger bikes. Given you're not stupid and mature but if that isn't the case then jump onto something less powerful.


As always, id recommend test riding all the bikes you're eyeing up first. You'd be surprised what you think looks comfortable actually isn't and vice versa.
 
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2WV

@2WheelVandal
Feb 25, 2017
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I ride a
A motorcycle, silly.
I crashed every bike until I started riding what I wanted to ride.... I'm not sure what that says but when I had little bikes the throttle was either on or off and I think I tried riding larger bikes the same way which don't work lol.
Hooligan :D ;)
 

IronicRbnd

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Jul 16, 2015
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2014 Honda CBR650F
I've seen this question or something similar a ton from beginners on here as well as outside of this forum. CC's aren't everything and shouldn't be used as the sole gauge for what motorcycle you should start on.

I created a video summarizing the best beginner bikes in my opinion and how you shouldn't only rely on CC's. In fact most of the bikes on the top 5 list below are 600 or above. Let me know if you have questions ;)


Top 5 BEST BEGINNER MOTORCYCLES...BUDGET FRIENDLY!
totally agree, its not the size that is the end all and be all, lots of factors at play when buying one's first ride, second and third too!
 
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Undead MV

If there is light, there shall be dark
Oct 9, 2017
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I ride a
Bajaj Avenger Street 220
I started to ride 6 months ago, and my bike is 220 cc, good enough for me, sometimes i feel that i need more power, i couldnt buy a 600cc back then and i thought, if i fall in a 600cc the hit will be more expensive than if i fall in a 220. Now i know that my next bike has to be a Suzuki Vstrom 650
 
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Mr. G

Essential G
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Less about the bike and more about your night weight and overall athletic and mental faculties. Imho
 

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