Why is it becoming so hard to build a channel?

TMMick

Wannabie Member
Jun 19, 2019
13
15
3
26
I ride a
2018 Heritage Softail 114
Has anyone else noticed this? It seems to be getting harder to build channels. I always grind to try to make the best content, I’m doing it for me but....
 
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HippoDrone

Admin
Jan 2, 2017
4,280
2,925
113
West Sussex, UK
I ride a
2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
I don't know what it was like before? My old channel had zero growth even with me being engaging and involved in that community of that genre, my current channel is growing, but I think it only grows because I put effort into gaining visibility. What do you do to encourage growth?
I'd suggest as a start, letting folk know on here at least what your channel is called? (I can't find you currently on YouTube).There is a thread where you can list your social media channels and put links to them here:


When you post a video, how much effort are you putting into your thumbnail, description and tags? :)
 

ThrttlGrub

ThrottleGrub.com
Jul 18, 2019
17
20
3
throttlegrub.com
I ride a
2018 Yamaha R1
2015 Harley-Davidson Street XG750
2017 Kawasaki Ninja 650
I've only just begun, but I can see already that it will be a lot of work to get the exposure I'm hoping for. Good insight above, but keep grinding. You'll get there!
 
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RideOnTwo

Smart Ass
Jun 14, 2019
179
194
43
49
Massachusetts USA
rideontwo.net
I ride a
BMW F750GS
I have been putting up videos for around 3 months and have climbed slowly so far but I am getting close to the 100 mark. The Challenge Accepted (Motovlog) facebook page that HippoDrone linked in another thread has some good video ideas that have helped me gain traction in the community.

I would also advise that you go to some of the other motovloggers and check out their videos, not only does it help them out but most of them will watch your videos and comment if you are doing the same. Everyone trying to Motovlog is in the same situation. The market is saturated with the same type of content and it is hard to find your unique voice that will make you stand out.

So far my best performing video is a review for a windscreen on my bike, and honestly I wish that I waited and did it differently, it is getting searches and some clicks but retention is not so good.

Bottom line, if your content is good the views will come and with that subs. Keep at it and you will be discovered by people that will want to watch your videos.
 

HippoDrone

Admin
Jan 2, 2017
4,280
2,925
113
West Sussex, UK
I ride a
2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
Is weird, so many of the older channels are saying "Motovlogging is dead", I think what they mean is they are no longer growing, and possibly because they now don't have the time to watch every persons video, so they engage less with their audience. And understandably so, if they are getting thousands of comments, it is tough to respond to each one, like they possibly used to do in their early days. A lot say there are no new motovloggers.... when there are thousands, it is just that their ears have fallen deaf on those with less than 10k subs. I am very fortunate to know several larger motovloggers, and none of them have forgotten the struggle. I hope if any of your channels take off, you remember this struggle and embrace it! :)
 

RideOnTwo

Smart Ass
Jun 14, 2019
179
194
43
49
Massachusetts USA
rideontwo.net
I ride a
BMW F750GS
I hope if any of your channels take off, you remember this struggle and embrace it! :)
@HippoDrone Not that my channel is big but i have been thinking about shouting out a different channel during each of my videos. I think this is a great way to support not only the friends i have made, but to give those that watch me an opportunity to check out someone they may not have seen before. Doing your 2 under 1k challenge was so rewarding and yet frustrating because I could only do 2 of them and there are so many. I intend to just give a quick and small shout out to x and link to them in my description, possibly do a card as well. The only way I would discontinue this is if I see a drop in watch time at the shout out. I guess if that happens I could do it at the end as well but those that are not going to stick that far would miss it. IDK, plan is to start once I get through the videos I have filmed already.
 

CafeBrakes

Coffee Brakes
Jul 26, 2019
111
180
43
26
www.youtube.com
I ride a
2018 Yamaha R3
For me as a completely new motovlogger, I'm glad that this community has a great support group. With less riders every year, a good majority of people live through our rides. Atleast thats what I did before I got my bike 3 months ago. Honestly I wouldn't force content but rather have fun first before thinking too hard about people watching you. I'm having fun just documenting my riding journey. Although I can't really say I have a major audience but for now I'm having fun. So enjoy the process first and the views will come!
 

HippoDrone

Admin
Jan 2, 2017
4,280
2,925
113
West Sussex, UK
I ride a
2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
@HippoDrone Not that my channel is big but i have been thinking about shouting out a different channel during each of my videos. I think this is a great way to support not only the friends i have made, but to give those that watch me an opportunity to check out someone they may not have seen before. Doing your 2 under 1k challenge was so rewarding and yet frustrating because I could only do 2 of them and there are so many. I intend to just give a quick and small shout out to x and link to them in my description, possibly do a card as well. The only way I would discontinue this is if I see a drop in watch time at the shout out. I guess if that happens I could do it at the end as well but those that are not going to stick that far would miss it. IDK, plan is to start once I get through the videos I have filmed already.
Spicy110, RJ, Shadetree Surgeon all tried that, but showing a 30 second clip created by the channel. Spicy found no one followed the rules so he stopped.
I think it is ace to shout out another channel, but doing it on each video could detract from its value, maybe either do a full on shoutout vid to a channel you like explaining why, or maybe just shoutout a channel that is relevant to the vlog you are making. I followed a channel a while back who just ended up doing shoutouts for the majority of the video, it did the opposite of promoting the smaller channels and became pretty hard work to watch. I guess getting the balance right is the hard bit.
 
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RideOnTwo

Smart Ass
Jun 14, 2019
179
194
43
49
Massachusetts USA
rideontwo.net
I ride a
BMW F750GS
I was just thinking of a quick "If you like motovlogs check out __ they have some good videos on ____ link in the description." And maybe add a card to the video.

It would also be someone I like to watch not someone that asks me to do it.

[edit] I get where you are coming from about maybe not every video, good point, thanks for pointing that out!
 

WheelyPerd

Everywhere @WheeliePerd
May 18, 2017
364
328
63
30
South Africa
I ride a
Triumph Tiger 800 XCx
So far my best performing video is a review for a windscreen on my bike, and honestly I wish that I waited and did it differently, it is getting searches and some clicks but retention is not so good.
Leave it up, but film another one that you like more / put more effort into. Could even call it "revised review" or something.
 

WheelyPerd

Everywhere @WheeliePerd
May 18, 2017
364
328
63
30
South Africa
I ride a
Triumph Tiger 800 XCx
Good Idea, maybe take it off and do an install to show how easily it can be put on. I was toying with that idea of making another and taking down the old but I like your idea better.
I would only take it down, if it was receiving no views. Consider if a link to your video is posted on a forum, rather have a viewer land on a working video (with new video in description / card) than land on "this video no longer exists", which I argue leads to the viewer closing the tab.
 

themagpie

As the Magpie Flies
Jun 18, 2019
23
47
13
28
Portland, OR & Corvallis, MT
www.asthemagpieflies.com
I ride a
2016 Honda CB500x, 2016 Triumph Tiger 800xc, 2005 Honda Shadow 750, 1980 Suzuki GS850gl, Batavus Moped, 1972 Honda CB175
There is no one answer. Growing on Youtube requires work.
  1. You need to make good content.
    1. Work on your story telling first. Make concise, easy to consume content. Cut out the Dead Space and anything that's not relevant.
    2. Make sure you have good audio. A new sub is not invested in you, and if they have to work to understand you because the music is too loud, or they can't hear you over the wind noise they will not stick around.
    3. Then make visually stimulating content. Try multiple camera angles. Just watching helmet cam footage while you talk over it just isn't quite cutting it anymore. We need to strive to become better film makers.
      1. Seriously. B-Roll is your friend.
  2. You should be putting in just as much effort to make a good Thumbnail, Title, Description and Tags.
    1. No one will know if your content is good if they don't click on your thumbnail. Do research. Look at successful content (not just motovloggers). Learn how to use a photo editing program. GIMP is free and is has a lot of the capability of Photoshop.
    2. Same goes for Titles, and ESPECIALLY your description and your tags. How is Youtube supposed to know how or where to recommend your content if you don't include *accurate* relevant tags/keywords. Youtube also looks at your description to make this determination.
      1. Have 3-5 Tags that you include on EVERY video. This would be tags that are relevant to all of your content. Including your Channel Name, maybe your Bike make and model, maybe the area you ride in most of the time, 'motorcycle', or motovlog etc. This makes it easier for Youtube to recommend more of YOUR content in the side panel on YOUR content.
      2. It's important to include your social links in ever single video description, as well as making sure you're including a few keywords you used in the title in the Description of the video. Make like a 2-5 sentence summary of the video in the first paragraph of the description, then include any relevant links or things you may have talked about that people may not know how to spell just from you saying it.
      3. This will set you apart form people who aren't taking it very seriously, have the added benefit of making you seem more professional and helpful to your audience.
  3. BE CONSISTENT.
    1. Figure out a schedule and STICK TO IT. Audiences respond really well to knowing they'll get to see content from you on a regular bases. Whether that's once a month, once ever two weeks or once a week, whichever. Make sure whatever schedule you pick you can keep up with it. Don't burn yourself out trying to do two videos a week, your audience will be plenty happy with once every two weeks if it means you're on time. It's more important that you upload when you say you're going to, than it is to upload a crappy video sporadically.
    2. Find your niche and embrace it. Yes we're all motovloggers, but there's a lot of micro-niches within the Motorcycling Genre. There's ADV, Dirt, Street, Cruiser, and even more niche than that is the style of videos that you create, do you make How tos, do you make philosophical content, do you make travel vlogs. Variety channels are going to be a LOT harder to grow. Offer your audience more than you're asking for in return. People are more likely to stick around if they feel like they're getting something out of the content , that's why How-Tos or list videos do so well, you're offering your audience value. Entertainment is also value, but you have to actually be entertaining.
      1. If you make garage how tos for a while then suddenly start making Vlogs, your engagement and views will noticeably drop because that's not what your current subs signed up for.
  4. ENGAGE with the Community.
    1. The first 48 hours a video goes up is the most vital. Respond to Every single Comment, in the 48 hour period. It does make a huge difference in whether Youtube will push your content on the home page of your subscribers or not. If YT doesn't see any engagement from you with your audience, it's less likely to show up in places like Searches, Home pages, and sometimes even Subscription lists.
    2. Build a Relationship with your Audience, spend time really learning what they're there for, Understand who they are, and what there interests are, it will help you make better content that connects with them better, which will in turn help you grow. If someone asks a question respond to it and if it's good make a video answering that question. Chances are others were wondering the same thing.
    3. Watch other people's content and leave /good/ comments. Don't just lurk and leave shitty comments like "hey.... good video... look at my channel please." People who leave comments like this get instantly blocked on my channel. Don't be that guy. Show that you engaged with their content, answer any questions they put out to their audience ya know, respond to what they talked about in the video.
      1. Set aside like 30min to an hour like once a week to watch like 10 videos or more and comment on their videos.
      2. A great way to consume a lot of content at once is to utilize the Playback Speed Settings and watch videos at like 1.5 speed
      3. If you leave a few engaged comments on people's videos in a row they're going to take notice after a while because they'll start to recognize your name, and they'll come check out your stuff.
    4. Engage with Active Moto Communities on Facebook
      1. This doesn't have to be just video groups, but other groups like MMV (Minimalist Moto Vagabonds), or Moto groups related to your bike, motocamping etc.
      2. Engage GENUINELY in that community. DO NOT SPAM YOUR LINKS EVERYWHERE. That's like asking for the ban hammer to drop on you. Read the rules of the group you're joining and don't break them. If you do drop links, make sure it's relevant to the conversation. Try to give more than you take.
    5. Build Audiences on Other Platforms.
      1. Start an Instagram, Facecbook Page, Twitter etc. build an audience there so you can share your videos with them when they go live. Pick one to start with and go from there. It's better to be active on one social platform than have a bunch that are dead.
      2. Share good photos that aren't just screenshots of your YT videos/channels.
      3. Again pay attention to Hashtags, and your descriptions. I won't go into how to grow on other platforms but it's kind of the same idea. Be Genuine, make good content, and engage with comments.
      4. If you like to write, think about making a website and post on a blog, you can embed some videos in your blog and elaborate more on a topic in writing etc.
  5. Accept the long Haul.
    1. Blowing up over night is a story that is few and far between. Most times there's also a GOOD reason they blew up. For the rest of us, growth comes with lots of hard work over a long period of time.
    2. Do research, watch channels that focus on learning how to grow on Youtube, and adapt your content. Never stop Learning.
      1. A few channels to watch to learn a little more about growth on Youtube:
        1. Youtube Creators https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkRfArvrzheW2E7b6SVT7vQ
        2. Nick Nimmin https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCei6wyubYC1I1FwZ54LZFiA
        3. Video Creators https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcB3bcWy0_QK7uPQvTD0LwQ
        4. Vanessa Lau https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdOPzgbosSnbfwd9-iXP2NA
 

Riderguide

Wannabie Member
Feb 24, 2019
241
230
43
South Australia
I ride a
BMW F800GS
I struggle with TAGS and how to research them. That is my weak link I think at the moment and I'm going to have to find time to really get in to that side of it. I'm gonna be naturally persistent with the channel as I actually enjoy the process of creating the content and will do it regardless of whether I'm getting views or subscriptions. I'm thinking though I need to remove my SUB count from view, as I'm finding it isn't necessary for me. I think the type of content I create should get views from TAG searches (if I get them right!) ........ I might hide my sub count today, it's rumoured YouTube are gonna do it anyway eventually I think I saw somewhere. As for using other platforms - yeh even someone with relatively low traffic I find that if I don't tweet a link, or post an Instagram or Facebook mention I see a dip in my performance. I have spikes of hits if I advise people on Reddit if they ask for tips but I find Reddit very frustrating as it's just a bucket of trolls sometimes and I can't stop myself from snapping at their heels :D - I'm tending to keep off Reddit now. There was a guy who allegedly owned a Panigale and he couldn't start it and was asking how to start it on Reddit!!! Beggers belief, all that money for a bike and he asks Redditers as opposed to ringing a Ducati dealer. It attracts some oddballs .......

On a side note ..... I find because I'm safety advice based as my core content, it keeps me at legal speeds too LOL, so I'm less at risk of picking up fines hahaha - so I'm saving money! :)
 

Riderguide

Wannabie Member
Feb 24, 2019
241
230
43
South Australia
I ride a
BMW F800GS
There is no one answer. Growing on Youtube requires work.
  1. You need to make good content.
    1. Work on your story telling first. Make concise, easy to consume content. Cut out the Dead Space and anything that's not relevant.
    2. Make sure you have good audio. A new sub is not invested in you, and if they have to work to understand you because the music is too loud, or they can't hear you over the wind noise they will not stick around.
    3. Then make visually stimulating content. Try multiple camera angles. Just watching helmet cam footage while you talk over it just isn't quite cutting it anymore. We need to strive to become better film makers.
      1. Seriously. B-Roll is your friend.
  2. You should be putting in just as much effort to make a good Thumbnail, Title, Description and Tags.
    1. No one will know if your content is good if they don't click on your thumbnail. Do research. Look at successful content (not just motovloggers). Learn how to use a photo editing program. GIMP is free and is has a lot of the capability of Photoshop.
    2. Same goes for Titles, and ESPECIALLY your description and your tags. How is Youtube supposed to know how or where to recommend your content if you don't include *accurate* relevant tags/keywords. Youtube also looks at your description to make this determination.
      1. Have 3-5 Tags that you include on EVERY video. This would be tags that are relevant to all of your content. Including your Channel Name, maybe your Bike make and model, maybe the area you ride in most of the time, 'motorcycle', or motovlog etc. This makes it easier for Youtube to recommend more of YOUR content in the side panel on YOUR content.
      2. It's important to include your social links in ever single video description, as well as making sure you're including a few keywords you used in the title in the Description of the video. Make like a 2-5 sentence summary of the video in the first paragraph of the description, then include any relevant links or things you may have talked about that people may not know how to spell just from you saying it.
      3. This will set you apart form people who aren't taking it very seriously, have the added benefit of making you seem more professional and helpful to your audience.
  3. BE CONSISTENT.
    1. Figure out a schedule and STICK TO IT. Audiences respond really well to knowing they'll get to see content from you on a regular bases. Whether that's once a month, once ever two weeks or once a week, whichever. Make sure whatever schedule you pick you can keep up with it. Don't burn yourself out trying to do two videos a week, your audience will be plenty happy with once every two weeks if it means you're on time. It's more important that you upload when you say you're going to, than it is to upload a crappy video sporadically.
    2. Find your niche and embrace it. Yes we're all motovloggers, but there's a lot of micro-niches within the Motorcycling Genre. There's ADV, Dirt, Street, Cruiser, and even more niche than that is the style of videos that you create, do you make How tos, do you make philosophical content, do you make travel vlogs. Variety channels are going to be a LOT harder to grow. Offer your audience more than you're asking for in return. People are more likely to stick around if they feel like they're getting something out of the content , that's why How-Tos or list videos do so well, you're offering your audience value. Entertainment is also value, but you have to actually be entertaining.
      1. If you make garage how tos for a while then suddenly start making Vlogs, your engagement and views will noticeably drop because that's not what your current subs signed up for.
  4. ENGAGE with the Community.
    1. The first 48 hours a video goes up is the most vital. Respond to Every single Comment, in the 48 hour period. It does make a huge difference in whether Youtube will push your content on the home page of your subscribers or not. If YT doesn't see any engagement from you with your audience, it's less likely to show up in places like Searches, Home pages, and sometimes even Subscription lists.
    2. Build a Relationship with your Audience, spend time really learning what they're there for, Understand who they are, and what there interests are, it will help you make better content that connects with them better, which will in turn help you grow. If someone asks a question respond to it and if it's good make a video answering that question. Chances are others were wondering the same thing.
    3. Watch other people's content and leave /good/ comments. Don't just lurk and leave shitty comments like "hey.... good video... look at my channel please." People who leave comments like this get instantly blocked on my channel. Don't be that guy. Show that you engaged with their content, answer any questions they put out to their audience ya know, respond to what they talked about in the video.
      1. Set aside like 30min to an hour like once a week to watch like 10 videos or more and comment on their videos.
      2. A great way to consume a lot of content at once is to utilize the Playback Speed Settings and watch videos at like 1.5 speed
      3. If you leave a few engaged comments on people's videos in a row they're going to take notice after a while because they'll start to recognize your name, and they'll come check out your stuff.
    4. Engage with Active Moto Communities on Facebook
      1. This doesn't have to be just video groups, but other groups like MMV (Minimalist Moto Vagabonds), or Moto groups related to your bike, motocamping etc.
      2. Engage GENUINELY in that community. DO NOT SPAM YOUR LINKS EVERYWHERE. That's like asking for the ban hammer to drop on you. Read the rules of the group you're joining and don't break them. If you do drop links, make sure it's relevant to the conversation. Try to give more than you take.
    5. Build Audiences on Other Platforms.
      1. Start an Instagram, Facecbook Page, Twitter etc. build an audience there so you can share your videos with them when they go live. Pick one to start with and go from there. It's better to be active on one social platform than have a bunch that are dead.
      2. Share good photos that aren't just screenshots of your YT videos/channels.
      3. Again pay attention to Hashtags, and your descriptions. I won't go into how to grow on other platforms but it's kind of the same idea. Be Genuine, make good content, and engage with comments.
      4. If you like to write, think about making a website and post on a blog, you can embed some videos in your blog and elaborate more on a topic in writing etc.
  5. Accept the long Haul.
    1. Blowing up over night is a story that is few and far between. Most times there's also a GOOD reason they blew up. For the rest of us, growth comes with lots of hard work over a long period of time.
    2. Do research, watch channels that focus on learning how to grow on Youtube, and adapt your content. Never stop Learning.
      1. A few channels to watch to learn a little more about growth on Youtube:
        1. Youtube Creators https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkRfArvrzheW2E7b6SVT7vQ
        2. Nick Nimmin https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCei6wyubYC1I1FwZ54LZFiA
        3. Video Creators https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcB3bcWy0_QK7uPQvTD0LwQ
        4. Vanessa Lau https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdOPzgbosSnbfwd9-iXP2NA
Same goes for Titles, and ESPECIALLY your description and your tags. How is Youtube supposed to know how or where to recommend your content if you don't include *accurate* relevant tags/keywords. Youtube also looks at your description to make this determination.
  1. Have 3-5 Tags that you include on EVERY video. This would be tags that are relevant to all of your content. Including your Channel Name, maybe your Bike make and model, maybe the area you ride in most of the time, 'motorcycle', or motovlog etc. This makes it easier for Youtube to recommend more of YOUR content in the side panel on YOUR content.
  2. It's important to include your social links in ever single video description, as well as making sure you're including a few keywords you used in the title in the Description of the video. Make like a 2-5 sentence summary of the video in the first paragraph of the description, then include any relevant links or things you may have talked about that people may not know how to spell just from you saying it.
  3. This will set you apart form people who aren't taking it very seriously, have the added benefit of making you seem more professional and helpful to your audience.
THAT SEEMS THE MOST RELEVANT TO ME! Thank you for these particular one's! Putting social links in my description! I have not done this! AWESOME. Cheers for this matey :)
 

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