Did I do something wrong?

ebiter76

Wannabie Member
May 3, 2020
16
18
3
24
I ride a
SSR110 pit bike/SSR XF250
So my 2020 SSR xf250 has been a super fun bike to learn on. However, the other day I was warming up my bike, remembered I needed to put some gas in, so I shut the bike off and fueled up. I went to go start the bike again, and mind you the bike does have a gear indicator, so I know I was in neutral, but when I started the bike it jumped into first gear, took off and laid over of course. I believe this messed up my throttle tube because it is sticking super bad now and i'm gonna have to get it looked at. I understand if I would have been holding in the clutch I would have been able to avoid this and throw it back in neutral, but should I have to do that? I most likely will everytime now anyways but that just seemed super unusual to me. Any advice?
 
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R-Rated

Remember to Have Fun! - Solar Bear 2020 Champion
Aug 4, 2016
2,535
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Middle Tennessee USA
www.R-RatedCustoms.com
I ride a
2014 Harley Davidson (FLHTK) Ultra Limited
So my 2020 SSR xf250 has been a super fun bike to learn on. However, the other day I was warming up my bike, remembered I needed to put some gas in, so I shut the bike off and fueled up. I went to go start the bike again, and mind you the bike does have a gear indicator, so I know I was in neutral, but when I started the bike it jumped into first gear, took off and laid over of course. I believe this messed up my throttle tube because it is sticking super bad now and i'm gonna have to get it looked at. I understand if I would have been holding in the clutch I would have been able to avoid this and throw it back in neutral, but should I have to do that? I most likely will everytime now anyways but that just seemed super unusual to me. Any advice?
I know my Harley has a clutch that even in neutral can be stiff just enough to drag when trying to push it around and yes it is adjusted right.

So I would recommend holding the clutch in. Just my experience...
 

motosera

Weirdo, mosher, freak
Jun 4, 2020
87
134
33
Cambridgeshire UK
www.motosera.com
I ride a
Honda CBR1100XX and Buel XB9R Custom
Speaking from experience of someone who's built more bikes than most have owned... bikes don't 'jump' from neutral to in gear on their own as they have detents within the gearbox which stop that happening.

However, what could have happened is that it wasn't actually properly in neutral, rather part way between 1st and neutral or neutral and second, just enough to get the light to come on. That can happen fairly easily, although it's hard to actually do on purpose.

The lesson is never trust the neutral light... always pull the clutch in when starting the bike and let it out slowly(ish) after it's started.
 

HippoDrone

Admin
Jan 2, 2017
5,085
3,701
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West Sussex, UK
I ride a
2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone
That is a very frustrating thing to happen, on some bikes the neutral light is occasionally preemptive, or you may have inadvertantly knocked it into gear putting your stand down?
 

R-Rated

Remember to Have Fun! - Solar Bear 2020 Champion
Aug 4, 2016
2,535
2,222
113
Middle Tennessee USA
www.R-RatedCustoms.com
I ride a
2014 Harley Davidson (FLHTK) Ultra Limited
It just occured to me this thread topic is like the whole park in neutral or gear debate in the motorcycle world.

Me? I park in gear 99% of the time. I learned the hard way enroute to a bike show the kickstand is the not the end all to keep a bike from falling over slowly. :rolleyes:
 

WheelyPerd

Everywhere @WheeliePerd
May 18, 2017
569
507
93
30
South Africa
I ride a
Triumph Tiger 800 XCx
Never believe that neutral light, it could be false. I've learnt twice, luckily didnt damage anything, but super scary.

I always park my bike in gear.
 

humes

Colorado Motovlogger
May 17, 2020
97
116
33
Denver, CO
www.instagram.com
I ride a
2012 Ducati Monster 696
Good tips above. Will add that I always stop my bike in 1st gear and follow "thumb, key, valve" ritual based on my Basic RiderCourse and follow the FINE-C protocol when starting up. Since my bike and most of our bikes have fuel injection and not carburetors it becomes the "thumb, key" ritual and the INE protocol. Full process in case helpful:

Engine stop procedure
1. First gear
2. Kill switch on ("thumb")
3. Ignition off ("key")
4. Kick stand down (some do kick stand to kill engine, e.g. before kill switch, so they always know it is down)
5. Dismount bike to left side (body before hands)

Engine start procedure
1. I typically stay off bike (allows inspecting/walk around; quick warm up while put on gear)
2. Ignition on (I in "INE")
3. Neutral (N in "INE")
4. Kill switch off (E in "INE")
5. Adjust my cold start lever if needed (not sure how many bikes have these; still on some FI bikes)
6. Pull clutch/front brake in, turn on starter, let clutch slowly out, release brake
7. If starting off the bike like I do, I put on my helmet, turn on GoPro's, and put on gloves here
8. Put right hand on front brake, mount bike from left side, level bike (no pressure on kick stand), remove front brake
9. Kick stand up
10. Check my own comfort, do a mental check (am I ready to ride?), idle RPMs, mirrors, surroundings
11. Head onward

This is what I do. Someone is free to criticize/call out something, or endorse/co-sign. Not saying you have to do it this way, just that it works for me. I also tend to do checks of all lights and horn at the beginning of each day I ride.
 
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SighBored

@thesighbored
Jan 18, 2015
2,521
1,024
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Malaysia
www.thesighbored.com
I ride a
2012 Kawasaki ZX-6R
It's a 2020 so I think it should be under some warranty? I would take it back to the authorized center to check.. Sometimes it (false neutral) happens.

I don't know if you killed the engine before kicking the bike into neutral, then proceed to fuel up.

The best is to always get the bike into neutral while the engine is still running, you can use the clutch to verify when you release it slowly if it's a false neutral then you can feel the bike roll as you release the clutch, only when you are certain the bike is in neutral (no movement when clutch released) then you can proceed to turn off the engine.

It may sound like a "D'Oh thanks Captain Obvious" thing, but I have seen some riders that tend to just shut the engine off without kicking the gear into N, then later when they want to start the engine, they will be fiddling with the gear shifter to get it into N before starting the bike up. I don't know if that hurts the gearbox.
 

WEB

L Plate Member
Feb 14, 2020
218
295
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I ride a
Triumph Thruxton + Harley Lowrider
I could get my old CB400 to go into gear just by rocking the bike back and forward the selector petal was so worn, probably not likely on a brand new 2020 bike though.
 
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