Avoidable? How can we predict and avoid thse type of hits from behind.

Riderguide

Wannabie Member
Feb 24, 2019
185
137
43
South Australia
I ride a
BMW F800GS
Tonight, I had my first ever collision with another vehicle in thirty-five years of riding. I'm :confused:gutted, because I pride myself on that record and my ability to foresee the dangers we face. The more we ride, the more we learn, but what can be learned here? Could I have avoided this? Imagine the carnage if I'd been hit again from the side by a car on the road I was shunted in to. Please share for opinion on what I could have done differently. By the way I'm not monetised on the Tube, never will be. I'm selling my channel and advice for free. Sorry for the #FBOMB (my Mum has never heard me say F*** and I'm 51 :p

 
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LoneWolfer

Lone Wolfer Garage
Jun 1, 2017
402
486
63
39
Connecticut
www.thelonwolfer.com
I ride a
Harley Nightster & Suzuki Savage
Yeah, you were following the stop sign and the cager seemed to think you were going to roll right through it. Hope you're ok and the bike is easily fixed on their dollar.
 

MotoNordic

Moto Nordico
Aug 11, 2018
40
38
18
Sweden
www.motonordico.com
I ride a
Honda CBR 600
I’m really sorry you had to experience that but luckily you seemed to get away pretty fine?

Just to be clear, this accident was of course not your fault in any way, shape or form and being hit from behind is probably the worst accident as a biker since it’s really not up to you....
However, one thing I like to do when the conditions allow so is to “sneak on by” and stand next to the first car instead of behind it, many cagers might see this as me only wanna skip the line but actually it’s a pure safety precaution from my side, simply to avoid being hit from behind when at halt.

This is what I’m talking about:

Yes, this works best at red lights and maybe not to well at stop signs, this technique does require you to be very updated in what’s going on at the moment and if at a red light make sure to arrive at the first car before it turns green, then go before the cars do at green light, if at a stop sign, obviously you’d probably wanna let the car go first and maybe even only attempt this if you are going to turn the other way then the car.

With that being said, shouldn’t you be way more to the side off the lane that you intend to turn to?
I’m writing from a Swedish motorcyclists view and maybe the laws and recommendations differ but I basically always show my intentions of where to go, with the placement of my bike in my lane.
For example: if I’m gonna turn right I also place the bike well to the right, before the actual turn (or intersection). The same goes for a left turn where I would place my bike to the left and if the road continues straight ahead in an intersection I’d place the bike in the middle (if I can’t use my technique shown in the video above).

As I said this way of placing in your own lane might differ due to different country’s, only my two cents on this. Keep on riding and stay safe!✌
 
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Riderguide

Wannabie Member
Feb 24, 2019
185
137
43
South Australia
I ride a
BMW F800GS
I’m really sorry you had to experience that but luckily you seemed to get away pretty fine?

Just to be clear, this accident was of course not your fault in any way, shape or form and being hit from behind is probably the worst accident as a biker since it’s really not up to you....
However, one thing I like to do when the conditions allow so is to “sneak on by” and stand next to the first car instead of behind it, many cagers might see this as me only wanna skip the line but actually it’s a pure safety precaution from my side, simply to avoid being hit from behind when at halt.

This is what I’m talking about:

Yes, this works best at red lights and maybe not to well at stop signs, this technique does require you to be very updated in what’s going on at the moment and if at a red light make sure to arrive at the first car before it turns green, then go before the cars do at green light, if at a stop sign, obviously you’d probably wanna let the car go first and maybe even only attempt this if you are going to turn the other way then the car.

With that being said, shouldn’t you be way more to the side off the lane that you intend to turn to?
I’m writing from a Swedish motorcyclists view and maybe the laws and recommendations differ but I basically always show my intentions of where to go, with the placement of my bike in my lane.
For example: if I’m gonna turn right I also place the bike well to the right, before the actual turn (or intersection). The same goes for a left turn where I would place my bike to the left and if the road continues straight ahead in an intersection I’d place the bike in the middle (if I can’t use my technique shown in the video above).

As I said this way of placing in your own lane might differ due to different country’s, only my two cents on this. Keep on riding and stay safe!✌
Actually in South Australia we only got legalised lane splitting two years ago. To be fair however, I did sometimes do it prior to then for the exact reasons you're saying @MotoNordic .... I've revisited the collision in my head a few times since Sunday and you're right, not a great deal I could do other than what you correctly point out and that's adjust my position differently in future to reduce the risk even further. To the far right or far left of a lane like this at a stop/give way is a GREAT idea mate, depending on the circumstances. This also would give a rider a better chance of a decent look over the shoulder before moving out. Thankfully no serious injury, only a sore neck this morning and a sore thumb. Thanks for the input and the time you put in replying :)
 

lupin

2016 Solar Bear Champion.
Jul 5, 2015
2,195
1,345
113
44
Australia
www.imlupz.com
I ride a
FZ1N
The only thing you can do is try to be off to the side in the hope that it gives the driver a little more room to swerve around you.

However it seems you are in South Aus, there is a reason that place is 30 mins behind the rest of us. :p
 

scooterwuf

L Plate Member
Jan 6, 2017
710
490
63
Philadelphia/South Jersey
I ride a
Kymco Downtown 300i
I'm in agreement with this thread. There's not much you could have done to prevent the crash, and the fault lies with the person who hit you. I think the real question is how do we manage those factors better that lead to a crash?

I was once rear-ended at a toll booth, and not by a driver who entered the booth behind me and didn't stop in time. It was by a SUV that was waiting behind me, and for some reason stepped on the gas pedal before I exited the booth. Bam - rear ended.

What could I have done to prevent this? Not much other than checking my mirrors constantly. That also would be difficulty considering I was paying the booth operator the toll cost moments before I was hit.

What situations like thes come down to are the real risk of riding. Our job is to be constantly vigilant, but we're not omniscient. That's how crashes and accidents happen. We don't see them coming. What he push ourselves to do is to see as many factors that can cause one, or work to prevent them by having riding tactics and strategies. Lane positioning is one, mirror checking is the other, and high visibility all help as well. Is that enough to guarantee our absolute safety every time we swing a leg over our bikes and ride off? Sadly no.

But these are the risk we accept. To ride, or not to ride. The choice is ours and all the responsibilities that come with it. It's also what makes us stronger riders.

- Wolf
 

R-Rated

Have Fun!
Aug 4, 2016
2,136
1,746
113
Clarksville to Nashville, TN
www.R-RatedCustoms.com
I ride a
2014 Harley Davidson (FLHTK) Ultra Limited
I am pulling on my old career that ended about 20 years ago for this part. Without checking the tail light, I cannot tell if it was working properly or if the brake light was illuminated at impact. Trained accident investigators can tell from a filament of the bulb was burning on the brake light or not.

It does not appear that anything like sun in the driver's eyes was at play.

I would check if the driver was distracted for any reason resulting in the collision.

Did the truck have a mechanical failure?

Now as a rider, here is my insight.

I can't see your hands clearly or feet at all. Some riders tend to either not keep the brake switch engaged when stopped at all or the switch is set to not come on until later in the lever movement despite having the lever pulled slightly.

As we used to say in the former career, an officer does not make a determination who is at fault in property damage cases. We merely record the evidence and let insurance companies sort it out.

As far as the question of possible avoidances - maybe a flashing brake light if it is legal. Possibly switch to an led bulb as the illumination may be brighter without additional heat melting anything.
 
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R-Rated

Have Fun!
Aug 4, 2016
2,136
1,746
113
Clarksville to Nashville, TN
www.R-RatedCustoms.com
I ride a
2014 Harley Davidson (FLHTK) Ultra Limited
Now for the "funny" I have seen riders do this to other riders in groups. The last time was a Roadglide Special hitting the right rear fender of a trike. Both riders were Road Captains. The turn was a slight right to merge into traffic at a city intersection the trike stopped then edged forward to see down the cross street. The Roadglide thought the trike was taking off and BAM!

The rider of the Roadglide was so embarrassed he just stepped off his bike with no kickstand down.
 

Riderguide

Wannabie Member
Feb 24, 2019
185
137
43
South Australia
I ride a
BMW F800GS
I am pulling on my old career that ended about 20 years ago for this part. Without checking the tail light, I cannot tell if it was working properly or if the brake light was illuminated at impact. Trained accident investigators can tell from a filament of the bulb was burning on the brake light or not.

It does not appear that anything like sun in the driver's eyes was at play.

I would check if the driver was distracted for any reason resulting in the collision.

Did the truck have a mechanical failure?

Now as a rider, here is my insight.

I can't see your hands clearly or feet at all. Some riders tend to either not keep the brake switch engaged when stopped at all or the switch is set to not come on until later in the lever movement despite having the lever pulled slightly.

As we used to say in the former career, an officer does not make a determination who is at fault in property damage cases. We merely record the evidence and let insurance companies sort it out.

As far as the question of possible avoidances - maybe a flashing brake light if it is legal. Possibly switch to an led bulb as the illumination may be brighter without additional heat melting anything.
He actually admitted he was distracted, 11 week old pup on the back seat jumping around, not ideal but an honest admission. I'm in that 'career' also and note/agree with your work on this ;-) ..... distraction is our enemy, and one that because of its nature is hard to defend against at times. Great input - cheers
 
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Riderguide

Wannabie Member
Feb 24, 2019
185
137
43
South Australia
I ride a
BMW F800GS
I'm in agreement with this thread. There's not much you could have done to prevent the crash, and the fault lies with the person who hit you. I think the real question is how do we manage those factors better that lead to a crash?

I was once rear-ended at a toll booth, and not by a driver who entered the booth behind me and didn't stop in time. It was by a SUV that was waiting behind me, and for some reason stepped on the gas pedal before I exited the booth. Bam - rear ended.

What could I have done to prevent this? Not much other than checking my mirrors constantly. That also would be difficulty considering I was paying the booth operator the toll cost moments before I was hit.

What situations like thes come down to are the real risk of riding. Our job is to be constantly vigilant, but we're not omniscient. That's how crashes and accidents happen. We don't see them coming. What he push ourselves to do is to see as many factors that can cause one, or work to prevent them by having riding tactics and strategies. Lane positioning is one, mirror checking is the other, and high visibility all help as well. Is that enough to guarantee our absolute safety every time we swing a leg over our bikes and ride off? Sadly no.

But these are the risk we accept. To ride, or not to ride. The choice is ours and all the responsibilities that come with it. It's also what makes us stronger riders.

- Wolf
Absolutely right on all counts. We take the risk and benefit from it most of the time, luck of the draw as to how we come out of collisions. Our VLOGS can only raise awareness to the dangers we face. Cheers for the input :)
 
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SighBored

@thesighbored
Jan 18, 2015
2,402
919
113
Malaysia
www.thesighbored.com
I ride a
2012 Kawasaki ZX-6R
You could check your mirrors, but from the footage, you are already in a queue, not pulling up to a stop. The retard behind you is suppose to be paying attention. That being said, you already need to focus on the traffic on both sides before making the cross and on top of that you need to check your mirrors too? Come on that's ridiculous.

Bottom line, it wasn't your fault, and there's nothing you can do if there's a moron cager behind you. Lucky it didn't knock you down and you are alright.

I would have personally added a long slurry of profanities and not even apologize to the viewers.. Haha..
 

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